Springbok Hunting in Africa

Interesting facts about the springbok

  • Springbok is one of the fastest animals on the planet. It can reach a speed of 60 miles per hour.
  • The springbok has a pocket-like, flap of skin on the rump which conceals a white crest. The erected flap of skin and exposed white crest can be seen whenever springbok detects predators. The white crest sends message to other members of the group.
  • Springbok has long, pointed ears, long neck and slender body. Lyre-shaped horns can be seen both in males and females (they are longer and thicker in males).
  • Springbok is herbivore (plant-eater). Its diet is based on grass, leaves, flowers, roots and tubers.
  • Natural enemies of springboks are cheetahs, leopards, hyenas and lions.
  • Springboks form a few types of herds: mixed herds (one dominant male with numerous females and their offspring), nursery herds (females and infants) and bachelor herds (young males).
  • Springboks can mate all year round. Most babies are born during the rainy season when food is abundant.
  • Pregnancy in females lasts 5 to 6 months and ends with one baby which remains hidden in the bush or tall grass during the first few days of its life. At the age of 3 to 4 weeks, young springbok joins a nursery herd with its mother.
  • Springbok depends on the mother's milk until the age of 6 months. Females often stay within their native herds, while males leave the herds at the age of 6 to 12 months to join bachelor herds.
  • Females reach sexual maturity at the age of 1 year, males at the age of 2 years
  • Springbok can survive up to 10 years in the wild.

The difference between a male and female springbok

The male springbok has thicker and heavier horns when compared with the female and is slightly heavier with a thicker neck.

Springbok male with thicker horns

Springbok Male

Springbok female with thinner horns

Springbok Female

Springbok jumping for joy

Springbok Prancing

Background information for African Springbok Hunting

Springbuck inhabits the dry areas of south and southwestern Africa and is mainly found on the open plains. Springbok are mainly active around dawn and dusk.

Activity is influenced by the weather; springbok can feed at night in hot weather, and at midday in colder months. They rest in the shade of trees or bushes and often bed down in the open when the weather is cooler. The mixed-sex herds or harems have a roughly 3:1 sex ratio; bachelor individuals are also observed.

The springbok is a slender antelope with long legs and neck. Both sexes reach 28 inches at the shoulder with a head-and-body length typically between 47 and 59 inches. The weights for both sexes range between 45 and 55 pounds.

Both sexes have a pair of black, 10 - 15-inch-long horns that curve backwards. The springbok is characterized by a white face, a dark stripe running from the eyes to the mouth, a light-brown coat marked by a reddish-brown stripe that runs from the upper foreleg to the buttocks across the flanks and a white rump flap.

Springbok trophy ram. Where to place your shot when springbok hunting in Africa

Shot Placement for Springbok Hunting

Springbok Hunting in South Africa

Your springbuck ram trophy should have an average shoulder height of around 28 inches, weigh about 50 pounds and have a horn length of approximately 12 inches. The Safari Club International score for a springbok is 31. This is measured by adding the length of each horn as well as the circumference of the bases.

The springbok is the national emblem of the Republic of South Africa. The name of this antelope comes from the Afrikaans word "spring" which means to jump. It’s very unique trait of “prancing” (see below), will make you understand why our ancestors gave it this specific name.

The trophy quality lies within the width of the bases, the overall length and the hooks/curls on the tips. A great trophy to hunt while on safari and a must for any collector interested in collecting all four springbok color variations. Springbok are fast sprinters.  Interesting jumping behavior can be observed during and after the rare rainfalls in the Kalahari. It is believed that for the joy of living, the animals jump up and down like bouncing balls, stretching their front and rear legs simultaneously and bending their heads down (called 'prancing').

Springbok are shot mainly in the open plains and stalks can be tricky. Sometimes a longer shot will be required.

Where to place your shot when Springbok hunting in Africa. Vital organs of a Springbok for shot placement

Springbok vital organs for shot placement

If you can approach within 250 yards, you are doing well and best take your shot. The flat-shooters will be the right rifle when hunting springbok.  For those hunters who do not wish to go through the red tape of having to bring a rifle in to South Africa Nick Bowker Hunting has available a 7mm custom made Remington Magnum fitted with a suppressor. The rifle is mounted with a Swarovski Z8 tactical scope. We have hand loaded Hornady ELD-X ammunition. This set up including ammunition is available as part of all hunting packages free of charge.

Hunting springbok will always be a challenge due to his size and excellent senses; stalk carefully, keep the wind in your favor, get as close as you can, bring the right equipment and then shoot straight.

IDENTIFICATION:
A medium-sized gazelle, very graceful and handsomely patterned with a long fold of skin on its back. The general color of the skin is khaki beige with distinct dark-brown stripes on the flanks above the white belly. The face is white with dark stripes running from the eyes to the mouth. The skin fold on the back is usually closed but when the animal becomes excited it thrusts it open, fanning a length of stiff white hair. Both sexes have horns.

A springbok trophy hunted in South Africa with Nick Bowker Hunting. One of Africa’s leading hunting safari outfitters

Springbok Trophy taken with Nick Bowker. Your Proffessional Hunter and Outfitter

Springbok Color Phases in South Africa. Hunting the Springbok Slam

Springbok exist with variations in colors called White Springbok, Copper Springbok and Black Springbok.

Common Springbok, Black Springbok, Copper Springbok, White Springbok

The Four Springbok Color Phases

Common Springbok, Black Springbok, Copper Springbok, White Springbok shoulder mount

The Four Springbok Color Phases Shoulder Mounted

Black Springbok Hunting in South Africa

Black Springbok forms part of the four springbok color variations. The Black Springbok usually ranks number two, behind the common springbok, in body and horns of the four variations. A great trophy to hunt while on safari and a must for any collector interested in collecting all four springbok color variations.

A medium-sized gazelle. The black springbok is not a subspecies, but a color phase of the South African springbok. Black springbok was developed by selective breeding; the color of the skin is all black except for the white facial stripe running up the front of the nose.

Black springbok has all the same traits as the common springbok. Hunting the black springbok is no different to hunting a common springbok

The difference between a male and female black springbok

The male black springbok has thicker and heavier horns when compared with the female.

Black Springbok male on the plains

Black Springbok male

Black Springbok female on the plains

Black Springbok female

A black springbok trophy hunted in South Africa with Nick Bowker Hunting. One of Africa’s leading hunting safari outfitters

Black Springbok Trophy taken with Nick Bowker. Your Proffessional Hunter and Outfitter

Copper Springbok Hunting in South Africa

Copper Springbok forms part of the four springbok color variations. The copper springbok usually ranks number three, behind the black springbok, in body and horns of the four variations. A great trophy to hunt while on safari and a must for any collector interested in collecting all four springbok color variations.

A medium-sized gazelle. The copper springbok is not a subspecies, but a color phase of the South African springbok. Copper springbok were developed by selective breeding; the color of the skin is that of a dark copper color with a darkened stripe running down the flanks with a very dark face.

Copper springbok has all the same traits as the common springbok. Hunting the copper springbok is no different to hunting a common springbok

Copper Springbok males on the plains

Copper Springbok males

White Springbok Hunting in South Africa

White Springbok forms part of the four springbok color variations. The color variations are not a separate subspecies.  White Springbok usually has the smallest horns and body of the four variations. A great trophy to hunt while on safari and a must for any collector interested in collecting all four springbok color variations.

A medium-sized gazelle. The white springbok is not a subspecies, but a color phase of the South African springbuck. White springbuck was developed by selective breeding; the color of the skin is all white except for the dark facial stripes and eyelashes.

White springbok has all the same traits as the common springbok. Hunting the white springbok is no different from hunting a common springbok.

White Springbok males on the plains

White Springbok with Common Springbok

A White Springbok trophy hunted in South Africa with Nick Bowker Hunting. One of Africa’s leading hunting safari outfitters

White Springbok Trophy taken with Nick Bowker. Your Proffessional Hunter and Outfitter